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The 10 Best Roofing Alternatives Ideas For Homes

Roofing alternatives for your home

A roof is an essential part of a house as it protects the home from all the external environment and elements. When it comes to construction of the roof, there are plenty of options in the market that homeowners can choose. Most homeowners get confused while choosing room material for their home.

Usually, people select concrete or concrete shingles for their homes, but there are plenty of good options in the market. The key to choose the right alternative is to consider the location and environment of that location.

Let us check out the best roofing alternatives for homes that homeowners can use for the construction of their roofs.

Stone-coated metal

Stone-coated metal roofs are gaining popularity due to their long life span. The roofing material can last for more than 50 years, that is why they come with warranties of up to 50 years. They are highly resistant to winds, hailstorms, and fires. Stone-coated roofs are made of crushed granite bonded to a durable metal like steel.

Homeowners install these metal sheets on wooden strips or battens to make air channels between roof and roof deck. These air spaces insulate the roof deck to keep it cool in summer and minimise the ice deposits in cold weather.

Single-ply roofing

Single-ply roofing is the most advanced and popular type of roofing material for commercial spaces. But they are also suitable for homes and residential settings. Single-ply roofs are further classified into two types- Thermoset and Thermoplastic.

Thermoset roofing membranes are made from synthetic rubber-like CPSE, EPDM, and Neoprene. The thermoset roof membranes are used for large roofs as they require homeowners to install fewer seams due to their large size.

Thermoplastic membranes are cohesive laps made by hot air welding. They are highly durable and stable due to a reinforcing layer of fibreglass or polyester.

Standing seam roofing

This is also a subtype of metal roofs that are made of vertical panels. There are two seams in every panel that stands up vertically. Standing seam roofing offers high strength and finished appearance to your roof. They are available in copper, galvalume, and galvanised steel material.

Standing seam plates, such as ice-and-water shield, are mounted over standard plywood roof cover and an authorised underlaying. Usually, the panels are 12 to 24 inches long and run parallel to the roof slope.

Shake shingles

The shake shingle roofing is chosen for its rustic, weathered appeal and provides outstanding energy efficiency and improved longevity compared to many other roofing materials. These perform well in areas of severe weather, such as hurricanes and tornadoes, as these quickly withstand strong winds and rain.

The most popular variety is cedar shake shingles, although others do exist. Typically, shake shingles are expensive than other roof materials, and if you want them to last a long time, they require regular maintenance. Otherwise, mould, mildew, and other infestations may have them infested.

Solar shingles

Solar roofing shingles are gaining in popularity in an era where energy efficiency dominates other discussions in the building. They consume sun-generated energy and turn the energy into a usable form. You may be able to power your home with solar roof panels (at least partially).

Still, some contractors avoid them because they rely on the direct sun above to get maximum exposure and because they are costly to purchase, build, and replace.

Rubber shingles

Most homeowners avoid artificial roofing materials, as they are worried about the environmental effects of the material. Rubber shingles are a synthetic alternative for roofing, but they are also reusable. They can be melted and used again for other items, once they run their course. Rubber shingles, however, aren't as robust as some of the alternatives.

Metal roofs

The metal roofing industry has come a long way from the unseemly galvanised sheets on hundred-year-old pole-barns and industries you might see. The present-day roofs are stylish, robust, and lightweight, providing excellent resistance against fires.

However, metal roofs are costlier than other options. They need maintenance to preserve their flawless visual appeal, but in the eyes of many contractors, their long life makes up for those disadvantages.

Living or green roofs

A natural green living roof can transform into a real garden. While it may be more costly and require more maintenance than other options, these rooftop environments provide fantastic benefits.

The benefits like their natural visual appeal, insulation, and rainwater management are hard to match. This is also a form of roof material that can reduce greenhouse gases to much extent. It is a living roof habitat that attracts birds, bees, and butterflies.

Synthetic tiles

In replicating traditional materials such as slate, shakes, and shingles, synthetic roof tiles can give authentic looks but with the advantages of lower cost and maintenance.

Such solutions are mostly made from rubber and plastic-based materials and are built in a standardised, consistent way that facilitates installation. They even come to match your unique architectural palette in various colours and used in tile roof restoration processes.

Cool roofs

Many of the roof materials mentioned above can be used to build a "cool" roof, which reflects heat. It is possible to define metal roofs, membrane systems, white tile roofs (like the one shown here), and even living roofs as cool roofs. Added coatings are also available to enhance the reflective properties of most of the roof materials.

Due to material properties or colour, cool roofs give superior reflective qualities, reflecting heat from the home structure and thereby reducing heat gain in the building. This decreases the magnitude of the necessary air conditioning, which is undeniably an advantage in hot climates.

Final words

The alternative roofing materials are gaining popularity due to a plethora of advantages they offer. With superior weather resistance and durability, these materials also offer enhanced energy efficiency for homes. By using these roofing alternatives, homeowners can save on their maintenance costs and their energy bills.

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Recommended reading

If you enjoyed this post and have time to spare, why not check out these related posts and dive deeper down the rabbit hole that is homeownership.

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